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sup cuhz, my names marvin. im new for right now but im going to spend more time on here to improve my tumbling skills lol. so fro the next onth im going to be on here 24/7 learning all there is to know about tumblr an showing you stuff an talking about my simple everyday lifestyle :D be sure to ask me questions an give me some tips along the way.

EMBA$$Y (@Emba309) tweeted at 2:31 PM on Tue, Nov 13, 2012: http://t.co/Gja0YYc5 (https://twitter.com/Emba309/status/268451068021702657) Get the official Twitter app at https://twitter.com/download

1 year ago
0 notes
polygondotcom:

Assassin’s Creed 3 has the distinction of arriving three years after Ubisoft made the series a yearly institution.
While the sort of Assassin’s-Creed-2-side-stories Brotherhood and Revelations were fantastic and great, respectively, the series is at something of a breaking point. Everything since Ezio Auditore da Firenze’s debut in Assassin’s Creed 2 has felt like a more or less inspired retread of similar ground. Assassin’s Creed 3 is a clear reaction to that.
Leaving the old world behind entirely, Assassin’s Creed 3 sees the series go bigger than it has before in the form of an open-world’ish action adventure set in 18th century America. It deals with some of the same themes as previous games, sure — the nature of power, the influence of one person and their ability to make a difference — but it also explores the nature of revolution, the danger of good intentions, and the slippery slope of dogma.
Read the whole review at Polygon.

polygondotcom:

Assassin’s Creed 3 has the distinction of arriving three years after Ubisoft made the series a yearly institution.

While the sort of Assassin’s-Creed-2-side-stories Brotherhood and Revelations were fantastic and great, respectively, the series is at something of a breaking point. Everything since Ezio Auditore da Firenze’s debut in Assassin’s Creed 2 has felt like a more or less inspired retread of similar ground. Assassin’s Creed 3 is a clear reaction to that.

Leaving the old world behind entirely, Assassin’s Creed 3 sees the series go bigger than it has before in the form of an open-world’ish action adventure set in 18th century America. It deals with some of the same themes as previous games, sure — the nature of power, the influence of one person and their ability to make a difference — but it also explores the nature of revolution, the danger of good intentions, and the slippery slope of dogma.

Read the whole review at Polygon.

1 year ago
17 notes
polygondotcom:

“Call of Duty: Black Ops 2 easily hits some of those expectations. At times it’s genius, as with the multiplayer’s redesigned class system. But at others, it doesn’t feel like it’s trying very hard.
Occasionally, it’s a complete mess.”
Read the whole review on Polygon.

polygondotcom:

“Call of Duty: Black Ops 2 easily hits some of those expectations. At times it’s genius, as with the multiplayer’s redesigned class system. But at others, it doesn’t feel like it’s trying very hard.

Occasionally, it’s a complete mess.”

Read the whole review on Polygon.

1 year ago
19 notes

And none for Gretchen Weiners…

(Source: angiiesayshi, via bayybee-tee)

1 year ago
118,507 notes
popchartlab:

The ur-Venn diagram—depicting the eternal struggle between yes, no, and maybe.
On sale for 20% off now.

popchartlab:

The ur-Venn diagram—depicting the eternal struggle between yes, no, and maybe.

On sale for 20% off now.

1 year ago
5,432 notes
polygondotcom:

Halo 4 gets what made Halo: Combat Evolved special.
The original Halo wasn’t just about great combat or multiplayer, though it set the standard for those things in shooters for the better part of a decade. There was also a sense of wonder and discovery that Halo’s sequels often struggled to find again. They were bigger, yes, and they had more of everything Halo had, but that was also sort of the problem. They were charting known territory, with pockets of novelty and an emphasis on adding new mechanics or upping the graphical stakes.
Halo 4 does some of those things. It possesses a striking sense of scale. There are new mechanics. It’s a technological achievement that most have assumed was outside of the reach of Microsoft’s now seven-year-old console. But it’s more than that. Halo 4 is a return to the series’ roots of discovery, of wonder and, at times, of awe. It helps that it might be the most consistently great game of the series to boot.

polygondotcom:

Halo 4 gets what made Halo: Combat Evolved special.

The original Halo wasn’t just about great combat or multiplayer, though it set the standard for those things in shooters for the better part of a decade. There was also a sense of wonder and discovery that Halo’s sequels often struggled to find again. They were bigger, yes, and they had more of everything Halo had, but that was also sort of the problem. They were charting known territory, with pockets of novelty and an emphasis on adding new mechanics or upping the graphical stakes.

Halo 4 does some of those things. It possesses a striking sense of scale. There are new mechanics. It’s a technological achievement that most have assumed was outside of the reach of Microsoft’s now seven-year-old console. But it’s more than that. Halo 4 is a return to the series’ roots of discovery, of wonder and, at times, of awe. It helps that it might be the most consistently great game of the series to boot.

1 year ago
149 notes
polygondotcom:

“It seems that the motivation behind the players in those core groups is not as different as I initially thought,” Harada says, “I came to this conclusion after seeing them in tournaments, and also after playing Smash Bros. more myself and also looking at YouTube videos — I began to see a lot of similarities. So I think if each community surrounding Tekken, Street Fighter and Smash Bros. could look more open-mindedly at each other’s games, you might find that there’s a lot more similarities and a lot that you’d enjoy about the game, and that can be said for all sides.”
Read the whole story, only on Polygon.

polygondotcom:

“It seems that the motivation behind the players in those core groups is not as different as I initially thought,” Harada says, “I came to this conclusion after seeing them in tournaments, and also after playing Smash Bros. more myself and also looking at YouTube videos — I began to see a lot of similarities. So I think if each community surrounding Tekken, Street Fighter and Smash Bros. could look more open-mindedly at each other’s games, you might find that there’s a lot more similarities and a lot that you’d enjoy about the game, and that can be said for all sides.”

Read the whole story, only on Polygon.

1 year ago
49 notes